Article Archive for April 2011

An apology to Mr. J.B. Handley
By Sullivan
Posted in syndicated on 29 April 2011
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Liar, liar, pants on fire!
By pj
Posted in syndicated on 29 April 2011
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Frank Rose’s The Art of Immersion
By SciencePunk
Posted in syndicated on 29 April 2011
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artofimmersion.pngThanks to W. W. Norton & Co. for passing me a copy of The Art of Immersion, by Wired’s Frank Rose. The book deals with one of my favourite subjects: storytelling, and how technology is shaping the way we tell stories. After four pages I had to put it down and fetch a pen and paper to keep track of all the ideas it was conjouring in my mind. And that was just the preface! So I thought it would be fair to write a quick review.

The brilliance of The Art of Immersion, to me as a story-teller, is that Rose only hints at the application of the technologies he discusses. With a few well-researched nods to innovative storytelling (e.g. the Wachowski brothers’ decision to drape the Matrix narrative through several different mediums - film, game, animation) he leaves the rest for the reader to imagine. Rose also looks at the blind alleys of this innovation - audience feedback mid-movie, smell-o-vision - to find out why some succeed where others fail.

This is a book about the digital age and so it’s no surprise that the bottom line is, of course, audience participation. We are a race of story-tellers, repeating, remoulding, reimaginging popular narratives regardless of origin or ownership. What is surprising is that this reciprocating model of storytelling stretches back far further than the litigious record companies and film studios would like to think. As far back as Dickens, who honed his craft by publishing books as serials, allowing the audience to voice their opinions and shape the story along the way. Or that hyperlinking, the foundation of the internet, was proposed as early as 1945, when the head of the Office of Scientific Research and Development, Vannevar Bush, realised that the only way humans could navigate the exploding corpus of knowledge was through semantic connections - the architecture of the greatest encyclopedias of the world would not be hierarchal but associative.

Ultimately Rose reveals that storytelling is woven into the fabric of our everyday life - where fairground rides can become million-dollar movies and advertising campaigns can rival the best television shows for narrative. To read this book is to realise that we are constantly submerged in a ocean of stories, invisible currents brought into focus by one medium or another. It’s a fascinating, exciting book for authors and audiences, and well worth reading.

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Marketing to Life Scientists
By admin
Posted in syndicated on 29 April 2011
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Is a career in marketing within the life science market a direction that you would like to consider? If not now, perhaps in the future? What is the the pros and cons of making this move? What it is like to move away from the bench into this line of work?

Life science suppliers are increasingly seeking new market opportunities where molecular, proteomic and cellular techniques are being utilized for new applications. Researchers in what are referred to as ‘applied markets’ frequently use many of the same techniques, and hence products, as their colleagues in the traditional life science market. But their more recent adoption of advanced research technologies suggests they are more likely to be open to learning of the broad array of solutions offered by life science suppliers. This hypothesis places a premium on effective marketing tailored to the unique needs of researchers in applied markets.

The Key Findings

  • Molecular diagnostic researchers evaluate or purchase new products slightly more frequently than agricultural biotechnology or biodefense researchers.
  • A majority of scientists believe that is important to stay abreast of new products and services that are designed for their research applications but this belief is more pronounced among molecular diagnostics scientists than agricultural biotechnology and biodefense researchers.
  • The majority of scientists in applied markets save the printed catalogs that they receive from vendors. However, they prefer to use Web-based versions for their product-information needs.
  • Molecular diagnostic researchers spend slightly more time per week than either agricultural or biotechnology researchers visiting vendor Web sites.
  • Biodefense researchers receive the fewest pieces of direct mail out of the three profiled markets.
  • Agricultural biotechnology researchers are visited less frequently by sales reps than their counterparts in biodefense researchers and molecular diagnostics.

That’s not for our kids
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 28 April 2011
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Your chance to win an iPad and beneift autism research
By Sullivan
Posted in syndicated on 27 April 2011
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Sullivan outs himself
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 27 April 2011
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Sullivan to attend IMFAR
By Sullivan
Posted in syndicated on 27 April 2011
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Wellington Grey NOT the Cartoonist
By admin
Posted in syndicated on 27 April 2011
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Hi, I’m Wellington Grey, but I am NOT the cartoonist Wellington Grey. If you after the later go to his original website: www.wellingtongrey.net.

One of the best cartoons of Wellington Grey I found is ‘Periodic Table of the Internet”:

This blog is created to express my thoughts and ideas about my life, things I find in the Internet, things I see in other countries and so on. Don’t expect it to be updated daily, but please come back if you like what you find here.

City of glass houses: how a lack of online privacy shapes “acceptable behaviour”
By SciencePunk
Posted in syndicated on 26 April 2011
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tan.pngMika Tan is a 30-something biochemistry graduate working in the United States. She also happens to be a successful porn actress. Tan helped me out when I was looking for a security expert to provide some context on an article about hacking luxury cars; since then I’ve been following her on Twitter, because, hey, nothing livens up a Twitter stream like a little gangbang gossip in the mornings.

One of the recurring themes on Tan’s list of bugbears is her ongoing strife with Facebook, which repeatedly suspends her account for breaching rules on graphic content. This opens up an important question about how social networks fit into the wider community.

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European Immunization Week
By jdc325
Posted in syndicated on 25 April 2011
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Faites-vous vacciner. Lassen Sie sich impfen. Vacunate. April 23rd-30th is European Immunization Week. As the WHO website points out, thirty countries in WHO’s European Region have reported a marked increase in measles cases. There have been 6,500 cases so far this year, with France accounting for almost 5,000 of these. Measles is, as I will [...]

I foresee that nobody will do anything about this problem
By Ben Goldacre
Posted in syndicated on 23 April 2011
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People can’t change?
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 22 April 2011
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Discredited doctor Andrew Wakefield in the NYT
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 21 April 2011
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How to search Left Brain/Right Brain
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 21 April 2011
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JOSEPH N. WALSH JR. from Princeton
By admin
Posted in syndicated on 21 April 2011
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Joe Walsh was graduated from the Princeton in 1956.

He prepared for Princeton at the Canterbury School, where he was active in sports, publications, and dramatics. At Princeton he participated in club sports for Cap and Gown, played varsity baseball for three years, and wrote his thesis on H. L. Mencken for the American Civilization Program. In his senior year, he roomed with Jeff Dunkak and Mark Grassi in Blair Hall. He retired in 1993 after a 37-year career with New York Telephone Co. and Nynex Corp. He served on the boards of Unity Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Syracuse, M&T Bank of Syracuse, the New York Medical College, and USA Datanet of Syracuse.

He devoted himself to community service as president of the Assn. of Mentally Ill Children of Westchester, as general campaign chairman for the United Way of Central New York State, chairman of New York State fundraising for the 1984 Olympic games, chairman of the Syracuse Symphony, and as a board member at LeMoyne College and the Apawamis Club, Rye, N.Y.

Joe Walsh died Sept. 2, 2003, surrounded by his family.

To his wife, Patty, children Elizabeth ’83, Joe ’86, and Mark ’90, and six grandchildren, the class extends deepest sympathy.

Careers Away From the Bench
By admin
Posted in syndicated on 21 April 2011
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Could you be missing out on an exciting and rewarding career outside of academic or industrial research?

Increasingly, Ph.D.-level scientists are becoming aware of other career opportunities beyond bench research. Join the workshop to consider what your own career path in these so-called “nontraditional” areas might look like. We’ll discuss the types of alternative careers available, how to parlay your current skills and values into a new area, ways to research career options, and how to develop the skills you might need. At the end, we’ll touch briefly on how to make your job search successful.

Get career away from the bench!

Will 25% of 16 Year-olds Really Live to be 100?
By jaycueaitch
Posted in syndicated on 20 April 2011
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Tuesday’s press was full of stories such as this suggesting that one in four current 16 year olds will live to be 100. I was a bit suspicious of this as it doesn’t seem that long since we were being told that current teenagers are an unhealthy bunch who only shift from their xboxes long [...]

‘Efficiency’ is in the eye of the beholder
By pj
Posted in syndicated on 20 April 2011
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RI Podcast - Episode 89. Horses for Courses.
By Dr* T
Posted in syndicated on 20 April 2011
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Unhappy Herbalist
By jaycueaitch
Posted in syndicated on 20 April 2011
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It would seem that some herbalists are not happy about the EU’s Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive (THMPD). This is the directive that requires all herbal remedies sold over the counter to be approved by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and that some herbal remedies only be available on prescription from practitioners [...]

Preliminary program for IMFAR
By Sullivan
Posted in syndicated on 20 April 2011
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93% of US parents trust vaccinations
By Kev
Posted in syndicated on 19 April 2011
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